Juggling the Challenges of Remote Employee Compensation

Over the last two years, employees have come to appreciate the benefits to a fully remote or hybrid work environment. These benefits include saving time commuting, more productivity, schedule flexibility, and better work / life balance. A vast majority of workers do not want to relinquish these benefits as we begin to migrate back into the office. According to Payscale’s 2021 State of Remote Work Report, 43% of employees expect more remote work options moving forward. Yes – remote work is here to stay. Considering the high number of employees anticipating opportunities for remote work and the bourgeoning talent retention challenges from the Great Resignation, organizations must consider how they will respond. In this Astronology®, we’ll briefly discuss a weakness many organizations are facing in connection with the recent demand for remote and hybrid work environments, and some compensation options to deal with this new work environment.


Three Common Approaches to Remote Work Base Pay Compensation

Payscale’s 2021 State of Remote Work Report exposed a weakness many organizations possess: 81% of surveyed organizations did not have a compensation strategy that incorporates any form of remote work. Let’s begin by considering what compensation approaches could be used for those opting to provide a fully remote and / or hybrid working environment. There are three common approaches to remote work compensation:

Establishing pay based on where the employees live – Using this approach allows the organization to incorporate the cost of living where the employee lives. This is a major concern for employees that live in locations with a high cost of living. They will find this approach beneficial as it guarantees they will at least earn a wage that will allow them to maintain their current living conditions. A disadvantage to this approach is that staff with the same tasks / job title, but with a lower wage due to their location, may feel negatively impacted. In time, this approach can lead to low employee morale and a lack of motivation.

Establishing pay based on the location of the organization – This approach involves using the organization’s headquarters as the benchmark for base pay. Doing so could eliminate unfair pay issues as employees with similar responsibilities would have the same pay – regardless of where they are located. Organizations must keep in mind that this approach could result in talent retention issues. For example, remote workers from a high cost of living area may not be inclined to work for an organization that has its pay centered on a lower cost of living headquarters.

Establishing pay based on the national pay average – A third approach could be to use the national average as the benchmark for base pay. While using the national average seems to be a fair approach, be mindful that workers from locations of high cost of living may find themselves being paid lower than their location’s cost of living. To alleviate this, some organizations have offered a 15% to 20% premium to workers from major cities such as New York and San Francisco. This approach also means workers from rural areas may possibly gain a bump in pay if the national average is higher than the local average.

Incorporating Total Rewards into Compensation for Remote Employees

Regardless of your stance for a fully remote, hybrid, or fully in office work environment, Astron recommends constructing your compensation philosophy on Total Rewards – no matter the industry or the workforce population. Total Rewards is the combination of benefits, compensation, and other rewards that an employee receives for their work. By combining both the intrinsic and extrinsic rewards and providing transparent messaging of these rewards, employees can see the bigger picture of how the organization values their contributions.

The main purpose of a total rewards compensation strategy is to help organizations strike the perfect balance of budget constraints and organizational culture, mission, and goals. By thinking about direct and indirect forms of compensation strategically, organizations can develop more effective compensation plans that support long-term engagement goals while also making the most of available resources. With this new phase of hybrid work environments, incorporating a total rewards approach to compensation may provide the best solution for both employers and employees.

Is your organization part of the 81% that does not have a compensation plan in place that considers remote compensation? Contact us today to learn how you can update your compensation program to reflect our ever changing world.

Is your organization part of the 19% that does incorporate geography into pay? Share your thoughts with us in the comment box below!

New Feature Available “Ask the Expert”

“Ask the Expert” is a new benefit exclusively provided to our Nonprofit Partners. If you are a Nonprofit Partner looking for guidance, support, and/or a resource, you can do that easily by completing the brief questionnaire below.  Your questions will then be directed to one of our vetted and approved Associate Member/s. Once received, they will be in touch with you in a timely manner, in order to help you with your inquiry.

Ask Your Questions Today Here: https://nonprofitresourcehub.org/ask-the-expert/

How Total Rewards Reflects An Organization’s Culture

By: Jill Krumholz

There was a time when compensation and benefits were relatively simple and straightforward. Companies provided wages in exchange for employee time and effort, and some sweetened the deal with insurance benefits such as health, life, and long-term disability. Over time, the competition to attract and retain a dedicated, productive workforce has driven employers to rethink the perquisites (perks) they offer.

This reevaluation led many to adopt a Total Rewards strategy, and the changes in workforce management in recent years has made the concept of Total Rewards even more relevant. 

A company’s culture – who it is and its values – plays a significant role in identifying the Total Rewards components that speak to an organization’s workforce and drive success, for both the business and individuals. Creativity is the key to a cutting edge Total Rewards program.

In this article, we will introduce the idea of Total Rewards and discuss how such a focus can shape and reinforce your culture.

Total Rewards is a Holistic Approach to Employee Recognition

Total Rewards takes a broader and more comprehensive view of compensation, extending beyond wages and health insurance, to address all facets of an employee’s life – work-related as well as personal. 

The approach recognizes that employees value more than a paycheck. They appreciate and in many instances expect companies to reward their service in ways that support all aspects of their lives with both direct and indirect compensation. Additionally, more workers are pressing employers to stand up as good corporate citizens and address current challenges facing society. One way many organizations address these concerns is with original Total Rewards designs. 

Distinguishing Direct and Indirect Compensation

Total Rewards programs encompass both direct and indirect forms of compensation. Direct compensation refers to the cash paid to employees for the work they perform. Direct compensation seems straight forward, but there is more to this category than just base pay. Bonuses, commissions, stock options, profit sharing, and other monetary earnings fall into this category. 

Indirect compensation is everything else.This broad concept is limited only by legal parameters, corporate budget, and the levers that drive an organization’s overall compensation strategy. Some standard perks that fall under this umbrella include health insurance, paid time off, and retirement plans (pension and 401(k)), but any non-monetary “extra” conferred is an indirect benefit.

The Flexibility of Indirect Benefits

In recent years, we have seen an explosion in the innovative ways companies attract, retain, and recognize their employees. In the most effective programs, Total Rewards offerings mirror the company’s values, mission, and overall culture. 

A company’s catalog of indirect benefits speaks volumes about who they are, where they are going, and how they want to get there. They inform applicants prior to the interview stage, thus attracting candidates who value the culture and direction of the organization. Once on board, indirect benefits greatly impact employee commitment and morale.  

Examples of indirect benefits that extend beyond paid time off and insurance coverages include:

  • Flexible work schedules 
    • Hybrid
    • Remote
    • Compressed workweeks (i.e., 4-day workweek)
  • Employee assistance programs supporting mental health needs
  • Wellness benefits, such as gym memberships
  • Tuition reimbursement
  • Child and elder care 
  • Sabbaticals to pursue work and non-work related interests
  • Student loan repayment

This list could go on and on. Each organization needs to reflect on their unique situation and devise a comprehensive Total Rewards strategy that dovetails with their business goals and the characteristics of their employee population. 

Building a Total Rewards Program Aligned with Your Company Goals, Culture, and Workforce

Whether updating your current program or migrating to a Total Rewards model, how you decide to appreciate and recognize your employees should tie back to your organization’s mission and values – what the company aims to accomplish in the world at large and how it appreciates and recognizes the people who help get it there. 

By reflecting on these big picture themes, companies can then distill those drivers into actionable items. By identifying meaningful formal and informal offerings, employers can craft tangible Total Rewards strategies that support those goals and evidence their corporate cultures. 

Balancing Corporate Interests and Employee Expectations

The better an organization understands who it is (or wants to be) and the traits that make its workforce unique, the more effectively it can integrate that knowledge into a dynamic Total Rewards design. To be successful, Total Rewards components must always align with corporate objectives and budgets, but they must also match the specific makeup of a company’s workforce. 

What motivates manufacturing facility employees may not be successful in an office setting. Similarly, younger workforces may be focused on career pathing, education and development opportunities, wealth accumulation, and childcare alternatives, while seasoned workforces may be looking for assistance with elder care, college preparation for their high school aged children, and retirement planning and transitioning.  

Synergies with Other Human Resources Initiatives

Total Rewards factors into a number of Human Resources policies, with indirect benefits being the backbone of many initiatives. Recruitment, performance management, recognition programs, and diversity, equity and inclusion are only a few of the HR programs that a strong Total Rewards approach enhances. 

Here are some examples where Total Rewards adds value:

  • In addition to a competitive salary and bonus, unique and broader thinking indirect benefits may help with talent recruitment by differentiating your company from the competition
  • Targeted, indirect benefits, such as company cars for field sales representatives, may improve engagement and productivity as part of innovative recognition programs
  • Performance management programs utilizing unique and specific incentives may increase employee productivity and engagement by focusing on what motivates particular groups or individual employees
  • Ensuring equitable distribution and access to benefits reinforces a company’s commitment to value all employees equally and create a welcoming, comfortable, and innovative work environment
  • Flexible work arrangements, such as remote options or work sharing, may result in higher retention and engagement rates

While wages are always the starting point for compensation discussions, today, applicants and employees require broad rewards packages that recognize their financial needs, personal interests, and address important societal issues. This expectation places a value on indirect compensation as never before seen, and it is through an inventive application of indirect compensation that a company’s culture and values can shine through – not only to employees but the greater marketplace. 

If you need assistance reviewing your existing compensation strategy and designing an effective Total Rewards program, we encourage you to contact us at RealHR. We welcome the opportunity to discuss your needs and help you reach your desired goals. 

Compensation Challenges in 2022: Brace for Turbulence

We are facing an interesting time in compensation. The events of 2020 and 2021 have left a mark on how both employers and employees view work. Many have changed course on what they believe is most important, resulting in chain of events: record breaking employee turnover and a scramble by leadership to curtail the surging storm of The Great Resignation. In this Astronology® we will review some of the factors in play with the current compensation upheaval. We also will discuss three suggestions employers can consider in order to successfully steer through these challenges.


The Current Global State

We must acknowledge that there is a lot happening in the world right now. Currently, the world is moving into a “new normal” where COVID-19 isn’t directly impacting our daily lives as much as in 2020. We are learning to “live with COVID.” Additionally, we are facing high inflation rates – the highest we’ve seen since 1981. With these high inflation rates comes the whispers of an incoming recession – a whisper that seems to be getting louder recently.

We also are in the midst of The Great Resignation – 4.3 million people quit their jobs in January 2022 alone. What are the biggest factors in why so many are leaving their jobs? According to a 2022 Ceridian Pulse survey, “Nearly half (46%) of those who reported looking for new employment said it was because they wanted better compensation, including higher salary and benefits, while another 33% seek more flexibility, such as remote work and flexible hours.”

We also must acknowledge the ongoing Eastern European conflict with Ukraine and Russia. Aside from the natural anxiety and stress from watching the news on this topic, both employees and employers are concerned about the global effects this conflict could have long-term.

In these turbulent times, it is important for employers to develop a plan to guide their organization through the storm.


Navigating Compensation Challenges in 2022: Three Tips

  1. Focus on retaining current employees.
    As mentioned in our “Employee Recruitment and Retention” guide, before scavenging the talent pool for new people, be sure to take care of the current people within your organization! There’s no point in recruiting new team members if you can’t keep your current ones. In the big picture of organizational success, employee retention is important. Try to improve how you recognize your employees for their contributions. You can start by surveying them to see how you can optimize your total rewards offerings to better compensate them.
  2. Offer more training and professional development opportunities to better leverage current talent.
    As mentioned in our “How to Create an Effective Performance Management Process” guide, providing improvement feedback through performance reviews is not enough. Employees are more willing to stay if they see your organization as a place where they have opportunities to build on their skills. Show your staff you really care about their professional growth by investing in training and professional development opportunities. Allocating a small portion of your budget to offer learning opportunities can help your current employees level up their skills, which can result in their ability to take on new responsibilities and / or move into management roles.
  3. Embrace indirect compensation.
    Yes, proper and fair cash compensation will always be preferred. However, including moments of indirect compensation or employee recognition can have a positive impact. A blog post from Payscale explains, “A 2019 study found the average turnover rate for organizations with no benefits plan is 157 percent, while organizations that offer benefits (including standard health benefits, vision or dental insurance and life insurance, to name a few) saw a 138 percent decrease in turnover. Indirect compensation, when done thoughtfully and intentionally, benefits all employees, regardless of seniority, age, title or tenure.”

Some forms of indirect compensation to consider incorporating include the following:

  • Insurance Programs
  • Life insurance
  • Retirement Contributions
  • Equity Program
  • Extra or Unlimited Paid Time Off
  • Fitness Reimbursement Programs
  • Childcare
  • Parental Leave
  • Hybrid and Flexible Schedules
  • Relocation Expenses
  • Tuition Reimbursement
  • Company “Swag Bags”
  • Company sponsored lunch / dinner

We may not know when the current swirl of economic challenges today will settle. But in the meantime, there is plenty leadership can do to assist in navigating these turbulent times. Are you looking for assistance in creating a compensation strategy that matches up to 2022’s challenges? Contact us today to learn more about our total rewards consulting services.

3 Reasons to Consider Follow-Me Print

Follow-Me Print allows users to send a print job to a central queue and then walk up to any printer and release their job. Here are some reasons to consider implementing this:

Badge Printing
  1. You don’t have to figure out what printers are close to a user. People are usually set up to print to machines that are close to their desks. If you are moving towards a hybrid office and people won’t have dedicated desks anymore, not only is it not practical to set them up to print to every device but they will also likely have difficulty figuring out which printer is close to them.
  2. Protect private information. If employees are printing pages with “private” or “personal” information, to comply with New York State’s SHIELD Act, those print jobs can’t be left out for anyone to claim accidentally and must be disposed of properly.
  3. Waste less paper. The days where you are throwing out reams of paper of unclaimed print jobs will be gone—the trees will thank you.

We can help you implement follow-me print using Papercut software or HP’s Access Control. Call 718-785-8243 ext. 3 or click on the button below to schedule a conversation to see how we can help.

Schedule a Conversation with one of our Printer/Copier Solutions Experts

Technology Outsourcing for Nonprofits – Why do it?

By outsourcing certain technological tasks, nonprofit organizations can focus on their core mission while leaving the day-to-day tasks of managing technology to a third party. This can be a cost-effective way for nonprofits to get the technology they need without breaking the bank.

Technology is an integral part of society and its continuous development. The way that technology has been integrated into our daily lives has changed dramatically over the last few decades, with new technological advances being made all the time. This means that there are always ways to make your work more efficient and effective through the use of technology.

In order to do this, nonprofit organizations are turning to technology outsourcing. By outsourcing certain technological tasks, these organizations can focus on their core mission while leaving the day-to-day tasks of managing technology to a third party. 

What is technology outsourcing?

Technology outsourcing for nonprofits refers to the process of hiring a third-party company to provide specific technological services. This can include anything from managing email systems to developing and maintaining websites. By outsourcing these tasks, nonprofits can free up time and resources to focus on their core mission.

There are many benefits to technology outsourcing for nonprofits. Perhaps the most obvious benefit is cost savings. By contracting out technological tasks, nonprofits can often save money compared to hiring in-house staff.

Technology outsourcing can help improve efficiency and effectiveness. By working with a qualified partner, nonprofits can get the expertise and support they need without having to invest in training or infrastructure.

When it comes time to choose a technology outsourcing partner, there are a few things to keep in mind:

  1. Be sure to select a company that has experience in working with nonprofits. This will ensure that they have an understanding of the specific needs and challenges of these organizations.
  2. It is important to select a company that is reliable and trustworthy. Make sure to ask for references and read reviews from past clients.
  3. Evaluate the cost of outsourcing and whether or not it is worth the investment. Nonprofits should carefully consider the amount of time and money that will be saved by outsourcing, and whether or not those savings are significant enough to justify the expense.
  4. Nonprofits should also assess how much control they will have over their outsourced tasks. Will they be able to customize their services to meet their specific needs? Will they have access to support and maintenance if needed?
  5. Finally, be sure to establish clear expectations and parameters with your outsourcing partner. This will help avoid any misunderstandings down the road. By taking the time to do your research and establish a strong partnership with your technology outsourcing provider, you can maximize the benefits of outsourcing for your nonprofit organization.

Nonprofit organizations can benefit greatly from technology outsourcing. By turning to a third party to manage their technological tasks, these organizations can focus on their core mission and goals.

Outsourcing can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of nonprofit organizations.

Downsides to Technology Outsourcing

There are a few drawbacks to technology outsourcing for nonprofit organizations.

When tasks are outsourced, there can be a loss of control over those tasks. Nonprofits may not be able to customize their technology services the way they would like, and they may have to rely on a third party for support and maintenance.

There is also always a risk that the third party will not be able to meet the expectations of the nonprofit organization. This could lead to frustration on the part of the organization and a decrease in efficiency and effectiveness.

Getting Started

There are a number of resources available to help nonprofits get started with technology outsourcing. TechSoup provides a wealth of information on technology topics as well as many other free and useful resources.

Nonprofit organizations are starting to turn to technology outsourcing for all of the reasons listed above, but before beginning any type of third-party relationship, make sure you carefully evaluate the cost-benefit analysis of outsourcing, as well as how much control they will have over outsourced projects.

You’ll want to make sure you’re getting what you need from your service provider before signing anything – so be sure to do some research beforehand.

“Should you outsource your IT for your nonprofit?” from TechSoup is another great place to start if you still have questions. And of course, don’t forget to ask your peers for recommendations! Many times other nonprofit professionals have already gone through the process of outsourcing and can offer great advice.

If you’d like to speak with our own technology experts feel free to contact us or schedule a 15-minute discovery call to see if RoundTable Technology can meet your organization’s needs.

We also have a free guide – What to Pay for IT? – that is useful when starting to compare providers. 

Claim your guide now

What is Personal Information in Data Privacy?

Data Privacy regulations require that we protect the privacy of people whose data we collect.

So, what does that mean?https://play.hubspotvideo.com/v/21006133/id/71128574524?renderContext=embed-id-selector&parentOrigin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.roundtabletechnology.com&pageId=71123504451#hsvid=dcd6f96f-7a79-499c-9087-79c534b2920d

Book your Free Data Consultation

Transcript below:

“While the specific data that needs to be protected does vary depending on the specific regulation, there are some general concepts and guidelines that can be helpful, especially if you are getting started.

First of all, data privacy regulations apply to the data or information that we collect about people.

People can be donors, volunteers, newsletter sign-ups, or our employees. 

Any people.

Personal information falls into a few general categories.

First, there is Personal Identifying Information or PII.

Some examples of PII include… name, address, email, phone, birthday – other, types of identifiers can also include geolocation, IP address 

Next, we have sensitive information —in the US, that’s social security, passport, health records, credit card, financial records. 

Sensitive information comes with added levels of risk — potential harm to the individual — if it is compromised. 

GDPR, the EU privacy law includes religious beliefs, ethnicity, sexuality, political opinions, union membership, and other items in what it terms as “special categories”.

So, these are common examples of personal information. 

This chart is a resource, which is available to you 

It provides a starting point for understanding what’s “personal information”. 

Definitions of personal information vary depending on the locality and the regulation. Check the text of the specific regulation for details.  

Knowing what you have is the essential first step in identifying your organization’s privacy risks.”

Book your Free Data Consultation

How To Compete for Top Talent And Retain Your More Valuable Employees

Featuring Our Guest Speakers: Ed Probst, Jennifer Loftus, & Matthew Thompson
We have put together a panel of experts to help you navigate the issues you are facing regarding obtaining and keeping talent.
This panel discussion will cover:
– How you can become an Employer of choice
– How to ensure your pay rates are retaining employees and not driving them away
– Benchmarking benefits to become more competitive in your recruiting efforts

The Power Of Collaboration

The Power Of Collaboration

Why You Should Be Collaborating with Your Friends and Colleagues in the NRH Community

When you join a community like the Nonprofit Resource Hub, you do it with the intent to establish trusted and long-lasting relationships with the Associate Members and Nonprofit Partners, exchange ideas, give and gain support,  and grow your business. 

The business world  is competitive but when you put effort into cultivating authentic relationships with those within the community, your business can actually thrive. Whether you’re in the for profit or nonprofit sectors, competition is unavoidable, but there also exists a wellspring of opportunities to collaborate with the other members and partners in the NRH community. When you make a concerted effort to collaborate, you open your business and/or nonprofit up to new ideas, new connections, problem solving techniques, and diversifying income streams.

What does it mean to collaborate with another small business?

Regardless of your industry or size, collaboration is a great tool that will help you build your business. Typically, collaboration is businesses working together to solve problems and achieve goals that seem to be out of reach when working alone.

When you combine the expertise, perspectives and skills of the people and organizations you collaborate with, all parties involved are better able to innovate, grow, and gain support. This stands true for the for profit and nonprofit businesses.

Benefits of business collaboration can fall under the following categories:

• Physical Capital – Share resources, equipment, facilities, or raw materials.

• Human Capital – Increase employment, develop employees’ skills and knowledge, encourage staff motivation, etc.

• Intellectual Capital – Tap into combined knowledge, capabilities, skills or expertise.

• Financial Benefits – Cut costs by sharing resources, bidding for larger contracts, etc.

But exactly how does it work?

Business Development: Collaboration helps small businesses compete with larger brands by combining knowledge, resources, consumer reach and technology. Both collaborating businesses will thrive as a result of their combined efforts to help one another. Through collaboration, you can achieve mutual growth, and will benefit from teamwork.

Expand Your Network: Collaborating with another business provides you the opportunity to develop a broader network than your business has on its own. When you collaborate with another business you present as a team, form alliances and reach new audiences.

Appeal To Grantmakers and Funders: When nonprofit organizations collaborate, they are joining forces to solve a problem. By bringing your skills, talent, and resources together, you are helping the process move at a faster rate and you are able to work more efficiently with your teams. This is an appeal to grantmakers and funders, as they are able to sooner see the results of the projects they fund and analyze the metrics of those investments. This can help ensure greater funding in the future for all of the nonprofits participating in the collaboration.

Inspire Innovation:  Collaboration is the spark that ignites  innovation because everyone brings a unique set of skills, knowledge, approaches, experiences and ideas to the table. Working together and honoring those differences opens the door to new ideas through instituting those unique perspectives. Collaboration inspired constant innovation. If you don’t innovate in today’s highly competitive marketplace, your business won’t be sustainable.

Share Knowledge: One of the biggest benefits of collaboration is the opportunity to learn and share  knowledge. Every interaction you have with someone outside of your own immediate circle can teach you something valuable. Some of the most fruitful business collaborations include two or more professionals who bring different perspectives, skill sets and knowledge to the table.

When you collaborate you can capitalize on the resources, knowledge, ideas and skills of others. Having a broader understanding of other areas and business practices can feed into your own decision-making processes and day-to-day business activities.

Solve Problems: Try to recall a recent challenge you encountered in your business. Did you reach out to a mentor, a partner, or some other trusted resource to get some guidance? When you collaborate with another business, you have a pool of people working on problems who can offer ideas to best solve the problem. By adding a new perspective from those you collaborate with, you often get results in the outcome going beyond what you expected to achieve.

The Takeaway

Collaboration is an integral part of building your relationships, your brand, and your business. Those on the receiving end of your collaboration are benefitting by having access to more resources, skills, and pool of talent. Through collaboration, you can achieve mutual growth, expand your networks, build your client list, and your brand. As a member of the NRH community, you are provided with the best talent, resources, and opportunities to work with others within the community to grow your business. Take advantage of those offerings and make the investment in building your relationships with the NRH community. The opportunities await. 

The Nicholas Center -a Decade of Championing Neurodiversity

Local organization supports individuals with Autism to learn, live and work in their community

April 11, 2022, Port Washington, NY – For over a decade, The Nicholas Center (TNC), a pre-eminent nonprofit organization specializing in Autism vocational training, community partnerships and peer connections, has revolutionized the way Autistic adults learn, live and work.

Based in Port Washington, the organization experienced a meteoric rise from its early days where the idea took shape in a small backyard barn in Plandome Manor, NY. Today, the organization supports over 120 Autistic individuals in two locations, both in-person and via remote. During the pandemic, TNC was successful in expanding services to a second location in Westchester, NY.

Stella L. Spanakos, Co-Founder and “mom-on-a-mission” started the organization, with Co-Founders, Nicole Sugrue and Patrick Bardsley to offer community engagement, vocational experiences and jobs, and peer engagement for her son, Nicholas, and others like him. Pleased to call Port Washington home, The Nicholas Center has woven itself into the fabric of community life – adding value by offering volunteer services to over twenty local non-profits and businesses, including Community Chest of Port Washington, Plant-a-Row-for-the-Hungry, North Shore Animal League of America, the Science Museum of Long Island.

This year, The Nicholas Center, along with partner, Spectrum Designs Foundation supported 14 individuals with Autism to earn certifications in Screen Printing, Food Handling and as Washroom Technicians. For 16-weeks, participants studied in-class and trained on-site at Spectrum Designs Foundation in Port Washington, gaining knowledge and on-the-job experience. A graduation ceremony was held to celebrate the graduates. “I am very proud of us for what we accomplished. It was a lot of work, but with this amazing program, we made it and are graduating” said graduate Brendan B. Funding for this program was provided by a New York State Department of Labor grant and administered by The Nicholas Center Vocational Support team.

The organization champions inclusion at work and in the community. For individuals who have been marginalized, “marching in a parade, is not just marching in a parade,” says Stella. Participating in activities that comprise community life is much more than a parade, a community project or a job – it means progress is being made for a population facing an 85% unemployment and under engagement rate once school ends at 21. The Nicholas Center is proud to be a leader in advocating for those voiceless in our society and are grateful to Port Washington and surrounding communities for their continuing support of our mission statement – to create innovative programs and services that allow Autistic individuals learn, live and work in the community.

Now more than ever, inclusion is pivotal to enriching community life. We learn from the differences of others and become better for it. For more information, please log on to: www.tncnewyork.org and follow us on FacebookInstagram, and LinkedIn

The Nicholas Center is a 501c3 non-profit organization, supporting individuals with Autism in leading full and productive lives in the community. A population facing 85% unemployment and under engagement after age 21, the program successfully supports and advocates for inclusion and opportunity. A recipient of the NY Senate Empire Business Award, “the most socially innovative agency of its kind in NY State,” and Nonprofit of the Year and Diversity in Business awards from Long Island Business News, The Nicholas Center is a proud member of the Port Washington and Pleasantville Chambers of Commerce and the Business Council of Westchester. 

###

Helping and supporting individuals with Autism lead full and productive lives in the community.

Tax ID # 45-202237